Oxford Trees

Joyce Kilmer

I think that I shall never see

A poem lovely as a tree.

 

A tree whose hungry mouth is prest

Against the earth’s sweet flowing breast;

 

A tree that looks at God all day,

And lifts her leafy arms to pray;

 

A tree that may in Summer wear

A nest of robins in her hair;

 

Upon whose bosom snow has lain;

Who intimately lives with rain.

 

Poems are made by fools like me,

But only God can make a tree.

Trees of Oxford and where to find them. A low cost, environmentally friendly tree-loving tour of Oxford.

For all of you environmentalists, activists, Tolkien and Alice fans and tree fanatics. Oxford has a host of famous and lovely trees to see.

 

University Parks

The tallest trees on earth reside in Oxfordshire in both Abingdon and Oxford. The Giant Redwood, which can reach up to 300 feet in height, up to 100 feet wide, live up to 2,000 years and can store more CO2 than any other forest in the world!

Seven Red Woods can be found in University parks. One was planted in 1972 and six were planted as far back as 1888.

 

Cost:

Free

Address:

S Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3RF

Opening Hours:

Monday to Sunday 7:45 – 16:00/22:00

https://www.parks.ox.ac.uk

 

Christ Church and hidden trees.

There are two trees hidden in the grounds of Christ Church, in fact, there is a set of lost trees in the Christ Church meadows all relate to Alice Liddel, the child who inspired Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland.

Inside the Dean’s Gardens, there is a Horse Chestnut tree which is claimed to be the original Cheshire Cat’s tree. It is important to note that there are about seven or eight trees people claim are the ‘real’ Cheshire Cat’s tree.

Just outside the Dean’s garden is the Pococke Garden.  Nineteenth-century in style and design, it contains the tree thought to have inspired Lewis Carroll’s Jabberwocky.

There are also a set of three trees in Christchurch meadow said to have been planted by Alice and her sisters but the College has lost track of them, see if you can be the first to find these lost trees.

 

Cost:

Free

Address:

Christ Church, St. Aldates, Oxford, OX1 1DP

Opening Hours:

Monday to Sunday 8am – 8pm (approx)

https://www.chch.ox.ac.uk/

 

Magdalen College

From C.S. Lewis’s Letters:

” My big sitting room looks north and from it I can see nothing, not even a gable or a spire, to remind me that I am in town. I look down on a stretch of ground which passes into a grove of immemorial forest trees, at present coloured autumn red. Over it stray deer. They are erratic in their habits. Some mornings when I look out there will be half a dozen chewing the cud just underneath me, and on others there will be none in sight — or a little stag (not much bigger than a calf and looking too slender for the weight of his antlers) standing and sending through the fog that queer little bark which is these beasts’ “moo.” It is a sound that will be as familiar to me as the cough of the cows in the field at home for I hear it day and night.”

If you really want to be inspired by some beautiful trees and idyllic scenery, all of which have been walked around by the likes of Oscar Wilde, C.S. Lewis and J.R.R Tolkien, then you must visit the inspirational setting of the Magdalen College Deer park.

A common theme that runs through both Lewis and Tolkien stories in the trees and nature coming to the rescue of man at the end of Lord of the Rings the Ents go to war and the trees come to life and save the day in Narnia.

 

Costs:

Adult: £6.00

Over 65s, children, students £5

Family ticket (2 adults and up to 3 children aged 7 or over) £20

Children under 7 years of age are admitted free of charge.

Address:

Oxford OX1 4AU

Opening Hours:

Monday to Sunday 10:00 – 17:00/19:00

https://www.magd.ox.ac.uk/

 

Botanic Garden

If you are looking for inspiration or just to see beauty crammed into every corner, you cannot go far wrong with a visit to the Oxford Botanic Gardens. This was originally a Jewish cemetery and now houses the world first botanic garden. Established in 1621, these gardens have inspired Philip Pullman and Tolkien. The Garden used to hold the Black Pine that was the inspiration for Tree Beard in Lord of the Rings, unfortunately, two limbs fell off the tree and it had to be cut down in 2014.

 

Costs:

Day tickets

Adult: £5.45

Adult + Gift Aid: £6.00

Children under 16: Free*

Address:

Rose Ln, Oxford OX1 4AZ

Opening Hours:

Monday to Sunday 9:00 – 17:00

https://www.obga.ox.ac.uk/

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